The UK road system has seen some signficant changes over the years. From new motorway networks to all-new vehicles, the question is, how different would your journey be?

Maps time travel

London - Edinburgh

1945 | 2015

Joney time:
12 hr 05 | 07 hr 09

410 miles | 416 miles

Est. fuel cost:
£128.14 | £54.25

Did you know?
- The M1 was built in just 19 months, and included two service stations: the first to open in the UK.
- The M1 was built to handle up to 14,000 vehicles per day? Now, believe it or not, it serves 10 times that number.
- The worst ever traffic jam took place on 5th April 1985, when roadworks caused a 40 mile-long tailback on the M1.
- The M2 was originally intended to act as a major link between London and our country’s travel ports, but traffic demand never materialised.
- The M2 contains a huge section of dual five-lane motorway.
- The M2 is the only ‘M’ road in England that doesn’t meet another motorway at a junction? Fancy that!
- There is no Junction 3 on the M1? Strangely, the road jumps from J2 straight to J4.
- The busiest stretch of motorway is Junction 13 – 14 of the M25, carrying 165,000 vehicles each day.
- The M6 was the first motorway to open in the UK, on 5th December 1958.
- The M6 is considered to be the most haunted travel route, with people sighting Roman legionnaires?
- The longest uninterrupted stretch of motorway is between Junction 8 and 9 of the M11, totalling 15.2 miles.
- The M62 is the UKs highest motorway, rising a lofty 1,222 feet above sea level.
- The A601(M) was originally built to service the Over Kellet quarries as a ‘quarry link’, before unauthorised use saw it designated as a motorway.
- The overall width of the A601(M) measures just 50 feet (15m).
- There is actually no road sign or point on a map designating the A635(M)? Effectively, it may as well not exist!
- London’s iconic building, the Shard, is longer than the A635(M).


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“Maps are like campfires – everyone gathers around them, because they allow people to understand complex issues at a glance, and find agreement about how to help the land.”